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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 26  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 184-188

Assessment of body composition and body mass index of adolescent school children in Imphal-West district, Manipur


1 Department of Community Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Medical Sciences, Porompat, Imphal, India
2 Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Imphal, India
3 Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Medical Sciences, Porompat; Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Imphal, India

Correspondence Address:
Bishwalata Rajkumari
Assistant Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru Institute of Medical Sciences, Porompat, Imphal, Manipur - 795 010
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0972-4958 .113248

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Background : Childhood obesity is a precursor for later disease risk and it is important to obtain a better understanding of the body composition and body mass index (BMI) in children. Objective: To determine the body composition and its relation with BMI of adolescents. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study of 3356 school children in age group 12 to 19 years residing in Imphal-West District, Manipur was conducted during May 2005 to May 2008. BMI and Body composition were determined using the TANITA Body Composition Analyzer (TBF-300, JAPAN). Results: The mean (Standard Deviation) BMI among boys and girls were 18.7 (2.6) and 19.2 (2.8) respectively and the difference was statistically significant (P = 0.000). Multiple linear regression analysis shows that BMI was significantly associated with waist circumference, weight, fat%, total body water (P = 0.000) and fat free mass (P = 0.041) among the boys and inversely associated with height, hip circumference and waist-hip ratio (WHR) (P = 0.000). Among girls, BMI was positively associated with hip circumference (P = 0.035), weight (P = 0.000), fat% (P = 0.000) and total body water (P = 0.000) and inversely associated with height (P = 0.04). Conclusion: Though fat percentage was found to be significantly correlated with BMI, it could explain little of the variation in BMI.


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