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 Table of Contents  
LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 33  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 112-113

Implementation and evaluation of a module to sensitize faculty and postgraduate students on competency-based medical education


1 Department of Community Medicine, Member of the Medical Education Unit & Institute Research Council, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Kancheepuram, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Submission29-Aug-2017
Date of Decision12-May-2017
Date of Acceptance23-Dec-2018
Date of Web Publication11-Feb-2020

Correspondence Address:
Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
3rd Floor, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Ammapettai Village, Thiruporur - Guduvancherry Main Road, Sembakkam Post, Kancheepuram - 603 108, Tamil Nadu
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jms.jms_66_17

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How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Implementation and evaluation of a module to sensitize faculty and postgraduate students on competency-based medical education. J Med Soc 2019;33:112-3

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Implementation and evaluation of a module to sensitize faculty and postgraduate students on competency-based medical education. J Med Soc [serial online] 2019 [cited 2020 Oct 30];33:112-3. Available from: https://www.jmedsoc.org/text.asp?2019/33/2/112/278104



Sir,

In today's era of medical education delivery, an immense attention has been given toward imparting competency-based medical education (CBME), and a significant need has been identified to shift from the conventional form of medical education.[1] However, the shift is really complex, as most of the faculties are not oriented about CBME, and this calls for a sensitization session for all of them. A modular training can prove to be a wonderful tool to achieve the objective of sensitization session.[1],[2]

However, the success of the sensitization session depends on the quality and comprehensive nature of the module and whether it is developed keeping learner interests in mind.[3] The designing of a module can be achieved by following the simple five steps of an Analyze, Design, Develop, Implement, and Evaluate model.[3] The first three steps focus on the gap analysis or need assessment, designing of the training schedule, and identification of the precise content of the module.[3] This is followed by the implementation of the module in which all the activities planned till now are put into action, with an aim to ensure the transference of learning.[3] However, if the adopted method of delivery is not appropriate/not decided based on the learner attributes, the outcome will not be fruitful.[3] Next and final step is to evaluate the module for its effectiveness and whether it meets the intended learner objectives.[3]

In the stage of implementation of a module based on CBME, there is a need to communicate about the conduct of modular training, date and time, and the venue to the stakeholders (faculty, postgraduate [PG] students, Dean, and members of the Medical Education Unit).[3] Then, some of the entrustable professional activities (EPAs) and appropriate assessment tools can be identified based on different specialties, so that faculty and selected PG students from different departments can be sensitized about the use of the same.[3],[4] This is followed by the step of training the trainers either on the basis of literature review or by the involvement of external experts.[3],[4] The aim is to make faculties aware about their roles and the process to be adopted for assessing the PG students, and the need to obtain feedback from the PG students after their assessment.[3],[4]

In addition, handouts and technical support (audiovisual aids, internet connectivity, etc.) will be arranged for participants to facilitate their learning.[3] Finally, the modular training will be conducted using the module keeping the intended objectives in mind which is to sensitize faculty and PGs about CBME and use of validated tools for the certification of EPAs to produce a competent PG.[3] Further, knowledge, skill, and attitude assessment of the learners should be done, and even feedback should be obtained from both faculty and PG students regarding the content, instructor, and environment.[3] Moreover, it should be inquired of them what all should be incorporated in the module, to improve its quality further.[3]

The last stage of a module development is evaluation, which is usually done with the help of Kirkpatrick four levels of evaluation.[3] In the first level, feedback forms can be used to ascertain how the participants felt or their personal reactions to the entire session.[3] In other words, it helps the organizers to understand whether the adopted method of delivery was effective and appreciated by the learners or not.[3] In the second level of learning evaluation, tools are used (like pre- and post-test) to measure the extent of the increase in knowledge before to after the modular training.[3]

At the third level, efforts are taken to assess the extent to which the participants applied their learning, and brought about a change in their overall behavior.[3] This assessment should be an ongoing process and can be done using appropriate assessment tools (namely, mini-CEX, DOPS, CbD, and Mini-PAT/Multi-source feedback) at periodic intervals to judge students' knowledge and skills and compare with the earlier assessment findings.[4] Finally, in the level four of evaluation, we have to measure the ultimate effect (production of a competent PG) which will be produced due to the intervention (module training), and this can be ascertained depending on the grades, which the PGs will achieve toward the end of the course.[3],[4]

To conclude, considering that CBME is still in novice stages in most of the institutes, the implementation and evaluation of a module to sensitize the stakeholders about the same deserves immense importance in the overall success of the program.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Shah N, Desai C, Jorwekar G, Badyal D, Singh T. Competency-based medical education: An overview and application in pharmacology. Indian J Pharmacol 2016;48:S5-S9.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Medical Council of India. Vision – 2015, Medical Council of India. New Delhi: Medical Council of India; 2011. p. 1-17.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Lehman BL. A.D.D.I.E: A Proactive Approach to Employee Training and Development; 2007. Available from: http://www.docplayer.net/8191220-A-d-d-i-e-a-proactive-approach-to-employee-training-development-white-paper-january-2007-author.html. [Last accessed on 2017 Aug 27].  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Norcini J, Burch V. Workplace-Based Assessment as an Educational Tool. Dundee: Association for Medical Education in Europe; 2007. p. 1-21.  Back to cited text no. 4
    




 

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