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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 34  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 81-85

Determination of hepatitis C viral load and human immunodeficiency virus 1 RNA viral load and their correlation with CD4 cell count in human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus coinfected patients attending a tertiary care hospital in Northeast India


1 Department of Microbiology, Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Imphal, Manipur, India
2 Department of Medicine, Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Imphal, Manipur, India

Correspondence Address:
Krossnunpuii
Department of Microbiology, Regional Institute of Medical Sciences, Imphal - 795 004, Manipur
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jms.jms_33_20

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Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–hepatitis C virus (HCV) coinfection is common due to their shared routes of transmission. Coinfected persons have a higher mortality rate. Some investigators reported an inverse correlation between hepatitis C viral load and CD4 cell count, whereas others have found no such correlation. Objectives: The objectives of the study were to determine hepatitis C viral load, HIV1 RNA viral load, and CD4 cell count and to find the correlation between hepatitis C viral load, HIV1 RNA viral load, and CD4 cell count in HIV-HCV coinfected patients. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study conducted in RIMS Hospital, Manipur, between September 2016 and August 2018 among 52 HIV and HCV coinfected patients. Hepatitis C viral load and HIV1 RNA viral load were measured using COBAS® TaqMan® HCV Test and COBAS® TaqMan® HIV-1 test, respectively. COBAS® TaqMan® 48 Analyzer was used for automated amplification and detection. BD fluorescent-activated cell sorter count machine was used for CD4 cell count. Results: Majority of the subjects were male and in the age group of 15–49 years. The most common mode of infection was injecting drug use. There was a statistically insignificant weak negative correlation between hepatitis C viral load and HIV1 RNA viral load, hepatitis C viral load and CD4 cell count, and HIV1 RNA viral load and CD4 cell count. Conclusion: This study found no correlation between hepatitis C viral load and CD4 cell count, HIV1 RNA viral load and hepatitis C viral load, and HIV1 RNA viral load and CD4 cell count. Along with the free antiretroviral therapy treatment made available, there is a need for strategies to rapidly diagnose HCV infection in HIV-HCV coinfected patients and enhance HCV treatment uptake so as to prevent HCV-related morbidity and mortality in these patients.


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